Complaints Procedure

If you have a complaint or concern about the service you have received from the doctors, or any of the staff attached to the Practice, please let us know by asking to speak to Amita Gohil (Reception Manager). We operate a Practice Complaints Procedure, which meets national criteria of the NHS for dealing with complaints.

How to complain

We hope that most problems can be sorted out easily and quickly, often at the time they arise and with the person concerned. If your problem cannot be sorted out in this way and you wish to make a complaint, we would like you to let us know as soon as possible. Ideally this will be within days because this will enable us to establish what happened more easily. However, if this is not possible please let us have your complaint in writing to Faizel Waka (Operations Co-ordinator), within six months of the incident, or within six months of discovering that you have a problem, provided this is within twelve months of the incident.

If writing to the Practice regarding a complaint please address it to:

Faizel Waka (Operations Co-ordinator)
Highfields Medical Centre, Merlyn Vaz Health & Social Care Centre, 1 Spinney Hill Road, Leicester LE5 3GH

What happens next

We will normally acknowledge your complaint within two working days, and aim to look into your complaint within ten working days. We shall then be in a position to offer you an explanation, or invite you to a meeting with the people involved. You may bring someone with you to the meeting.

The purpose of the meeting will be to:

  • find out what happened and what went wrong
  • make it possible for you to discuss the problem with those concerned
  • make sure you receive an apology, if this is appropriate
  • identify what we can do to make sure the problem will not recur

Complaining on behalf of someone else

Please note that we keep strictly to the rules of confidentiality. If you are complaining on behalf of someone else, we will need their written permission to discuss the matter with you.

Exceptions to this are if you are complaining on behalf of your child, or on behalf of someone who is mentally incapacitated.

Complaining to NHS England

Our Practice Complaints Procedure is designed to help us put right anything that has gone wrong and to improve our service to patients. However this does not affect your right to approach the local Area Team for NHS England if you feel you cannot raise the complaint directly with us, or if you are dissatisfied with the result of our investigation. 

You can complain or give feedback:

By post to:

NHS England
PO Box 16738
Redditch
B97 9PT

By email to: [email protected]

If you are making a complaint please state: ‘For the attention of the complaints team’ in the subject line.

By telephone: 0300 311 22 33

General Practice in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland is in crisis and asks patients for their understanding and help

 

General practice is in crisis, and is asking patients to change the way they treat the service.

 

Before the pandemic general practice was already in decline due to decades of underinvestment.  The number of practices had fallen by 778 (10%) in the past 8 years leaving 2.5million patients having to find a new one.  The number of senior GPs had plummeted by 4,685 (22%) over just 5 years.

 

Dr Nainesh Chotai (GP, Senior partner at The Glenfield Surgery and Chair of LLRLMC) said “consecutive governments have raised expectations without the required investment. We are asking our patients to recognise this, and help us to ensure that our limited resources are used for those patients with the greatest need”.

 

Despite this general practice had risen to the task of providing a safe service throughout the pandemic, and in March 2021 provided 4.9 million more appointments than in February 2021, and 2.3million more appointments per month than before the pandemic (March 2019).

 

In addition, general practice has delivered the majority of the Covid Vaccination Programme.

 

Instead of praising general practices, some newspapers have castigated them, falsely accusing GPs of not pulling their weight, and practices of closing their doors.

 

Dr Fahreen Dhanji (GP Partner at Latham House Medical Centre, and LLRLMC Board Member) said “unfortunately many of our patients believe the false impression given by the tabloids, resulting in mistrust, abuse and unwarranted complaints”

 

As hospital departments restart their outpatient clinics these are often done remotely, and they frequently expect general practice to pick up their work (for example arranging blood tests and scans, prescribing medication, arranging follow up, issuing sick notes) in addition to their own workload.  This further reduces general practices’ ability to help our patients.

 

Dr Grant Ingrams (Managing GP Partner at Oakmeadow Surgery and LLRLMC Board member) said “We need hospitals and other services to recognise that general practice is at breaking point.  Every time someone expects general practice to carry out additional unfunded and uncontracted work, this reduces general practice’s ability to meet the health needs of our own patients.”

 

General practices are asking patients to:

Be respectful and kind

Be self sufficient

Be prepared

Be thoughtful

Be Covid aware

Be patient

Be cancer aware

 

Dr Grant Ingrams added “Be cancer aware is a crucial message. We are concerned that there has been a reduction in people presenting with symptoms of possible cancer or other serious conditions.  We want patients to use services responsibly so we can see those with worrying symptoms without delay.

 

Dr Nainesh Chotai concluded “general practitioners and our staff have been affected like other members of our communities.  Too many of our colleagues, family members, friends, and patients who we have known for many years, have died or otherwise suffered.  Today, we are asking for our patients to work with us, and for other services to recognise our current limitations.  Together we can ensure that we focus our resources on patients with the greatest health need and get through this pandemic and the recovery period minimising the long term damage to the health of our communities.”