NHS prescription charges

Most adults in England have to pay prescription charges.

Some items are always free, including contraceptives and medicines prescribed for hospital inpatients.

The current prescription charge is £9.35 per item.

A prescription prepayment certificate (PPC) could save you money on NHS prescription costs:

  • a 3-month PPC costs £30.25
  • a 12-month PPC is £108.10

Find out how to save money with a PPC

Who can get free prescriptions

You can get free NHS prescriptions if, at the time the prescription is dispensed, you:

  • are 60 or over
  • are under 16
  • are 16 to 18 and in full-time education
  • are pregnant or have had a baby in the previous 12 months and have a valid maternity exemption certificate (MatEx)
  • have a specified medical condition and have a valid medical exemption certificate (MedEx)
  • have a continuing physical disability that prevents you going out without help from another person and have a valid medical exemption certificate (MedEx)
  • hold a valid war pension exemption certificate and the prescription is for your accepted disability
  • are an NHS inpatient

You’re also entitled to free prescriptions if you or your partner (including civil partner) receive, or you’re under the age of 20 and the dependant of someone receiving:

  • Income Support
  • income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • income-related Employment and Support Allowance
  • Pension Credit Guarantee Credit
  • Universal Credit and meet the criteria

If you’re entitled to or named on:

  • a valid NHS tax credit exemption certificate – if you do not have a certificate, you can show your award notice. You qualify if you get Child Tax Credits, Working Tax Credits with a disability element (or both), and have income for tax credit purposes of £15,276 or less
  • a valid NHS certificate for full help with health costs (HC2)

People named on an NHS certificate for partial help with health costs (HC3) may also get help.

Read more about who can get free NHS prescriptions.

Check you’re eligible for free prescriptions

There’s a simple way to find out if you’re eligible for free NHS prescriptions and any help with other NHS costs.

Use the eligibility checker.

Free prescriptions for certain medical conditions

People with certain medical conditions can get free NHS prescriptions.

Medical exemption certificates are credit-card-size cards. They are issued if you have:

  • cancer, including the effects of cancer or the effects of current or previous cancer treatment
  • a permanent fistula (for example, a laryngostomy, colostomy, ileostomy or some renal dialysis fistulas) requiring continuous surgical dressing or an appliance
  • a form of hypoadrenalism (for example, Addison’s disease) for which specific substitution therapy is essential
  • diabetes insipidus or other forms of hypopituitarism
  • diabetes mellitus, except where treatment is by diet alone
  • hypoparathyroidism
  • myasthenia gravis
  • myxoedema (hypothyroidism requiring thyroid hormone replacement)
  • epilepsy requiring continuous anticonvulsive therapy
  • a continuing physical disability that means you cannot go out without the help of another person (temporary disabilities do not count, even if they last for several months)

Find out more about medical exemption certificates.

How to apply for a medical exemption certificate

Ask your doctor for an FP92A form to apply for a medical exemption certificate.

Your GP will sign the form to confirm that your statement is correct. At your GP’s discretion, a member of the practice who has access to your medical records can also sign the form.

Your certificate will be valid from 1 month before the date the NHS Business Services Authority receives the application form.

The MedEx lasts for 5 years and then needs to be renewed. You may receive a reminder that your certificate needs to be renewed.

If you do not receive a reminder, it’s your responsibility to make sure it’s renewed.

Check if your exemption certificate is valid

Free prescriptions for pregnant women

If you’re pregnant or have had a baby in the past 12 months, you get free prescriptions if you have a valid maternity exemption certificate.

Maternity exemption certificates are credit-card-size cards.

To apply for a maternity exemption certificate, contact your doctor, midwife or health visitor.

The certificate will last until 12 months after the expected date of birth of your baby.

If your baby’s born early, you can continue to use your certificate until it expires.

If your baby is born late, you can apply for an extension.

If you apply after your baby is born, your certificate will last for 12 months from your baby’s birth.

Find out more about maternity exemption certificates.

Free prescriptions if you have a low income.

If you have a low income, you may be eligible to receive financial help through the NHS Low Income Scheme.

To apply for a HC2 certificate, complete form HC1, which is available from Jobcentre Plus offices or most NHS hospitals. You might also be able to get an HC1 form from your doctor, dentist or optician.

You can also get a HC1 form by calling 0300 123 0849.

You qualify for a full help HC2 certificate (which includes free NHS prescriptions) if your income is less than or equal to your requirements, or your income is greater than your requirements by no more than half the current English prescription charge.

You qualify for a limited help HC3 certificate if your income is greater than your requirements by more than half the current English prescription charge.

The HC3 certificate shows how much you have to pay towards your health costs.

Certificates are usually valid for between 6 months and 5 years, depending on your circumstances.

Find out more about the NHS Low Income Scheme

How can I claim a refund on a prescription charge?

Ask the pharmacist, hospital or doctor for the refund form (FP57) when you pay for your prescription. You cannot get one later.

You must apply for a refund within 3 months of paying the prescription charge.

If you receive Universal Credit and meet all the criteria to be entitled to help with health costs but did not get a refund form (FP57), contact the NHS Business Services Authority. They’ll consider applications for refunds on a case-by-case basis.

If you paid for a prescription prepayment certificate (PPC) and have become exempt from paying for prescriptions, you may be able to get some or all of the money back for your PPC.

The NHS Business Services Authority website explains how to claim a refund for the PPC fee.

You can also call the Department of Health and Social Care publications order line on 0300 123 0849 to order a leaflet.

Important numbers

  • NHS Help with Health Costs helpline: 0300 330 1343
  • Prescription services helpline: 0300 330 1349
  • Queries about medical exemption certificates: 0300 330 1341
  • Queries about prescription prepayment certificates (PPCs): 0300 330 1341
  • Queries about tax credit certificates: 0300 330 1347
  • Call 0300 123 0849 to order a paper copy of the HC12, HC5 and HC1 (SC) forms

General Practice in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland is in crisis and asks patients for their understanding and help

 

General practice is in crisis, and is asking patients to change the way they treat the service.

 

Before the pandemic general practice was already in decline due to decades of underinvestment.  The number of practices had fallen by 778 (10%) in the past 8 years leaving 2.5million patients having to find a new one.  The number of senior GPs had plummeted by 4,685 (22%) over just 5 years.

 

Dr Nainesh Chotai (GP, Senior partner at The Glenfield Surgery and Chair of LLRLMC) said “consecutive governments have raised expectations without the required investment. We are asking our patients to recognise this, and help us to ensure that our limited resources are used for those patients with the greatest need”.

 

Despite this general practice had risen to the task of providing a safe service throughout the pandemic, and in March 2021 provided 4.9 million more appointments than in February 2021, and 2.3million more appointments per month than before the pandemic (March 2019).

 

In addition, general practice has delivered the majority of the Covid Vaccination Programme.

 

Instead of praising general practices, some newspapers have castigated them, falsely accusing GPs of not pulling their weight, and practices of closing their doors.

 

Dr Fahreen Dhanji (GP Partner at Latham House Medical Centre, and LLRLMC Board Member) said “unfortunately many of our patients believe the false impression given by the tabloids, resulting in mistrust, abuse and unwarranted complaints”

 

As hospital departments restart their outpatient clinics these are often done remotely, and they frequently expect general practice to pick up their work (for example arranging blood tests and scans, prescribing medication, arranging follow up, issuing sick notes) in addition to their own workload.  This further reduces general practices’ ability to help our patients.

 

Dr Grant Ingrams (Managing GP Partner at Oakmeadow Surgery and LLRLMC Board member) said “We need hospitals and other services to recognise that general practice is at breaking point.  Every time someone expects general practice to carry out additional unfunded and uncontracted work, this reduces general practice’s ability to meet the health needs of our own patients.”

 

General practices are asking patients to:

Be respectful and kind

Be self sufficient

Be prepared

Be thoughtful

Be Covid aware

Be patient

Be cancer aware

 

Dr Grant Ingrams added “Be cancer aware is a crucial message. We are concerned that there has been a reduction in people presenting with symptoms of possible cancer or other serious conditions.  We want patients to use services responsibly so we can see those with worrying symptoms without delay.

 

Dr Nainesh Chotai concluded “general practitioners and our staff have been affected like other members of our communities.  Too many of our colleagues, family members, friends, and patients who we have known for many years, have died or otherwise suffered.  Today, we are asking for our patients to work with us, and for other services to recognise our current limitations.  Together we can ensure that we focus our resources on patients with the greatest health need and get through this pandemic and the recovery period minimising the long term damage to the health of our communities.”